Small Business COVID-19 Diaries: Part 4

Small Business COVID-19 Diaries: Part 4

COVID-19 upended economic activity and disrupted bandar poker online business owners’ lives. Here are stories from real entrepreneurs about how the novel coronavirus pandemic is impacting them.
As states begin easing restrictions that were put in place to thwart the spread of COVID-19, many small business owners still find themselves picking up the pieces. While the work never stopped – even while operations were suspended or limited – many are finding that a return to “normalcy” isn’t exactly what they expected.

In this installment of business.com’s small business COVID-19 diaries, we catch up with three entrepreneurs who have emerged from the initial shock of the pandemic in very different ways.

Looking for resources on how to help your small business through the COVID-19 pandemic? Visit the business.com COVID-19 resource page.

Todd Spodek, managing partner of Spodek Law Group
Spodek Law Group PC is a law firm in New York City that provides litigation services for criminal defense as well as divorce and family law. The firm employs 10 people.

Managing partner Todd Spodek, who is a business.com community member, was approved for a Paycheck Protection Program loan of $200,000 in April under the initial round of funding for the program. Since then, he has cut extraneous expenses, caught up with past clients and legal adversaries, established referral networks to help clients access needed assistance, and established a pro bono program for first responders.

While Spodek acknowledges his business has been interrupted, he is largely optimistic.

“To be honest, everything kind of worked out OK,” he said.

He attributes the success of the firm to effective planning at the outset of the pandemic, including an immediate cutting of expenses, pivoting to a remote work model, negotiating with landlords, and community outreach efforts that generated significant goodwill and helped to establish new referral networks.

“A lot of businesses are focused on sales … but the more you focus on sales when people are not in that mindset, the more distance you’re putting into that relationship,” Spodek said. “I took the approach that … our clients need the help now and need someone to organize things for them. We’re focused on providing help. When their life implodes, we’re there.”

According to Spodek, the firm does this through initiatives like the pro bono program for first responders. It also partnered with an organization called Blueground, which provides fast, furnished housing to people who find themselves without a living arrangement on short notice. Additionally, the firm partners with a service called Crisis Text Line, which offers 24/7 support with a counselor.

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